Monday, June 17, 2013

Stardust: Book Review


Hopelessly crossed in love, a boy of half-fairy parentage leaves his mundane Victoria.n-English village on a quest for a fallen star in the magical realm. The star proves to be an attractive woman with a hot temper, who plunges with our hero into adventures featuring witches, the lion and the unicorn, plotting elf-lords, ships that sail the sky, magical transformations, curses whose effects rebound, binding conditions with hidden loopholes and all the rest.

This is going to be more of a movie/book comparison than a book review. Hopefully you don't mind, but when homework requires the book, and the screenplay to be read and the movie watched, it's hard not to make the comparison.

To be honest, I think the way the movie tells the story makes a little more sense and is a little more realistic than what the book does. I'm not saying the book was bad. The movie kept to the book for the most part.  But unsurprisingly there were differences between the book and the movie. In the book,Tristan has a sister, whose 6 months younger than him, a fact that Tristan never seems to find suspicious, their is no Humphrey tormenting Tristan, though their is a Victoria and their relationship isn't quite what the movie suggests, but she does tell him to go after the star.

The way Tristan and his father cross the wall is completely different from the movie. No one gets hurt, though seeing poor Tristan get beaten up by a 90-something-year-old in the movie was funny. A minor point I suppose but one of the things I prefer about the movie is that Tristan is told about his mother before he crosses the wall.  In the book, he believes his father's wife to be his mother and he continues to believe that until near the end of the book. The movie, I believe, was a little more believable in that respect.

Since Tristan did not exactly cross the wall in the movie, we skip over a lot of elements that happened in the book and he lands on the star. I can see why the movie did this as it pushed the pace of the story along and you don't really lose anything for them having done it.  For in the book, a creature helps Tristan out. Tristan helps him out, etc. And eventually the creature gives Tristan a Babylon candle, which is how he finds the star.  The candle works in completely different ways between the book and the movie but the effect is the same. Again, the way Tristan received the candle in the movie seemed more efficient and more believable, especially since his Mother really did want to see Tristan again.

Nursery rhymes appear throughout the book. But they're real in the world Tristan finds himself in.  A unicorn and a lion are found fighting for a crown. That's how the unicorn is encountered in the book. The unicorn had significantly more screen time in the book than in the movie.

However the pirates have significantly less time in the book than in the movie.  The captain is also not named Shakespeare, he's not gay and he doesn't pretend to throw Tristan out a window..  He is very kind. I prefer the movie version. The captain and crew had a great deal more personality and I really enjoyed the contrast of Shakespeare being gay and a fierce pirate.

Their is no real showdown at the end of the book.  The witch approaches the star, asks hers some questions, especially about her heart and, after having tried to kill her several times before, wishes her well and walks away. As for Tristan's...uncles... Well, the last one dies in a way completely different from the movie. So, either way you look at it, the book has an anti-climatic ending.

He meets his mother. Travels for 8 years and then, finally takes the throne.

The book has more characterization in it, more character depth and more complications in it than the movie does.  The movie sticks to the major plot points and has more action.  The book, however, has more sex scenes and more cuss words. Both are worth checking out if you haven't seen them.  But I much prefer the faster-paced movie.

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